COME AND TAKE IT!

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  The defiant statement “Come and Take It” dates from the first battle for Texas independence from Mexico in 1835. The “it” being referred to was a Spanish-made, bronze artillery piece of six-pound caliber that had originally been provided to the Anglo-American settlers in the Mexican northern territory of Texas as a defensive measure against attacks from hostile Comanche tribes. The history of this Spanish-made, artillery piece is somewhat complicated and unusual. In 1825 the Government of Mexico had granted permission to American Green DeWitt to proceed with the settlement of 400 Anglo-American families in what is now south central Texas near the confluence of the San Marcos and Guadalupe Rivers. The six-pounder canon in question was sent to these Anglo-American settlers at their request in 1831 by the Mexican political chief of the region to be a part of their protective armament against the Indians.

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However, shortly after the canon was transported to the Anglo-American settlers, relations between these settlers and the increasingly dictatorial Mexican central government began to deteriorate. By 1835 Mexican authorities decided that leaving the canon in the possession of the Anglo-Americans would be unwise as secession talk became more and more prevalent throughout the the Anglo-American community. Consequently, the Mexican military commander of the area, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, dispatched a small detachment of soldiers to retrieve the gun, but the Anglo-American colonists in the settlement of Gonzales refused to part with the artillery piece. As a result of this rebuff, Colonel Ugartechea then sent a squadron of 100 horse cavalry to present a more muscular demand for the canon. However, the Anglo-American Texans rallied a force of 140 settlers and again rejected Ugartechea’s return demand. The culmination of this Anglo-American Texan-Mexican confrontation was an exchange of gunfire that became know as the “Battle of Gonzales.” The outcome the skirmish was the retreat of the Mexican horse cavalry squadron.

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The taunt “Come and Take It” was a motto adopted by the Anglo-American rebels when they pointed to the canon 200 yards to their rear and told the Mexican cavalry commander, “there it is-come and take it.” Soon after the conflict began, at the request of the Anglo-American leaders, the ladies of the settlement hastily made a flag to fly over the cannon. The flag featured a white background with a black cannon in the center, and the motto “Come and take it!” As a result of President Obama’s recent executive actions that put Americas’ Second Amendment rights in jeopardy, Texas Governor Greg Abbot tweeted a simple message at POTUS: “COME & TAKE IT.” You may now send the “COME AND TAKE IT” message to those who oppose Americas’ Second Amendment rights with a Right Side News Bumper Sticker.

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10x3_Take_It_AR15_010916 600 10x3_2nd_Amendment_Pistol_010916 600 These are printed on a superior vinyl which can be applied and re-positioned or removed.

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