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It's Not a Crisis, It's a National Emergency

Written by Diana West

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“Dear Colleagues,” Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., wrote to his fellow senators, “I write to inform you of a development that threatens the 250px-Jeff Sessions official portrait croppedfoundation of our constitutional Republic.”

That should grab them. It grabbed me.

Sessions continued, quoting from a National Journal report on a recent White House meeting where President Obama “made it clear he would press his executive powers to the limit” in order to prevent millions of illegal aliens from being deported. Obama could spare “between 5 million to 6 million adult illegal immigrants (from) deportation under a similar form of deferred adjudication he ordered for the so-called Dreamers in June 2012.”

Obama, the report continued, “has now ordered the Homeland Security and Justice departments to find executive authorities that could enlarge that non-prosecutorial umbrella by a factor of 10. Senior officials also tell (The National Journal) Obama wants to see what he can do with executive power to provide temporary legal status to undocumented adults.”

Unless my multiplication skills fail me, such a “non-prosecutorial umbrella” potentially covers a staggering 50 to 60 million persons in flagrant violation of U.S. immigration law.

“This is breathtaking,” Sessions wrote. “The action the president is reportedly contemplating would be a nullification of the Immigration and Nationality Act by the executive branch of government. Indeed, it would be an executive nullification of our borders as an enforceable national boundary. By declaring whole classes of illegal immigrants beyond the reach of the law, it would remove the moral authority needed to enforce any immigration law, creating the very open-borders policy explicitly rejected by Congress and the people. And it would guarantee that the current illegal immigration disaster would only further worsen and destabilize.”

It’s worth lingering over the senator’s sober language to absorb its explosive meaning. As Sen. Session tells it – and he tells it like it is – this president is pushing the “executive nullification of our borders as an enforceable national boundary.”

How can this be happening?

The simplest reason is the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives continue to fund the federal bureaucracy that is the mechanism of border nullification. This bureaucracy revolves around the trillion-dollar-per-year Department of Health and Human Services, which includes the Administration of Children and Families (ACF), the Office of Refugee Resettlement and other non-democratically empowered enforcers of fundamental demographic change. You like your community? Well, you can’t keep your community – not if the Washington social engineers whose salaries you pay successfully settle blocs of aliens in Yourtown, USA – “temporarily.”

How “mean” and “uncharitable,” the left and pro-amnesty right will say: Where is that guiding sense of Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Baptist charity that inspires the faith-based charities “helping” in the “crisis”? Me, I’d like to know where the “charity” is in these same “charities” that We, the People, pay taxes to support, too. Destroying a nation’s sovereignty, it turns out, is one long public gravy train.

Thanks to reporting by the websites Refugee Resettlement Watch and Conservative Tree House, and the news site WND.com, it becomes possible to quantify quickly the extent to which these “charities” are little different from other federal bureaucracies with hands in our pockets – although maybe some of the others are still dedicated to our protection. Hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars go to groups that help resettle aliens in this country, WND.com reports, including about a half-dozen religious organizations.

In 2012, for example, 93 percent of the $71 million the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops spent assisting refugees came from taxpayer dollars. The same year, 96.8 percent of the $41.7 million total income of the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service was also public monies. We see a similar balance sheet at the Baptist Child and Family Services (BCFS), notorious lately for its (thankfully) withdrawn bid to buy a $50 million Texas resort to house alien minors. The Conservative Tree House placed BCFS’s 2012 tax return display online, revealing that of the “charity’s” $67.3 million in revenue, about 94 percent, or $63.3 million, came from you and me – not by charitable choice. In other words, this is more “redistributive change,” only with sanctimony on the side.

But not the kind of money to buy a Texas resort, right?

As chaos wracks our nation, fortune smiles upon BCFS. Already in 2014, the “charity” has received more than a quarter-billion taxpayer dollars from the HHS’s Administration of Children and Families. Citing government grant statistics, The Conservative Tree House also pointed out that $190,707,505 dropped in BCFS’s lap on one giddy day this month. Go buy the “kids” a new resort?

“Congress must not acquiesce to spending more taxpayer dollars until the president unequivocally rescinds his threat of more illegal executive action,” Jeff Sessions told his colleagues.

That’ll be the day. But Sessions is correct that Congress mustn’t pay another public penny to nullify our borders and wage demographic war on our communities – and it certainly mustn’t approve the president’s “supplemental” request for $4.3 billion.

But how about cutting off money to the bureaucracies and “charities” that will only continue chipping away at U.S. nationhood? This is not a “crisis,” but a long-term state of emergency. In this national emergency, the proper and patriotic use of taxpayer dollars is for security and deportations.

Only then might this existential threat to what remains of our republic pass.

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press 2013) and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press 2007). In Fall 2013, West brought out a companion volume to American Betrayal titled:The Rebuttal: Defending American Betrayal from the Book-Burners, which includes essays by Vladimir Bukovsky and M. Stanton Evans, among others.

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