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Arab Spring Egypt's 'Legal' Persecution of Christians

Written by Raymond Ibrahim

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The Investigative Project on Terrorism

Post "Arab Spring" Egypt continues exposing its true nature, including now legal persecution of Christians. Earlier this month, according to Fox News, Dimyana Abdel-Nour a "pale, young Christian woman sat handcuffed in the courtroom, accused of insulting Islam while teachingTerrorism of Christians by Muslims history of religions to fourth-graders." Her accusers are 10-year-old Muslim children who say she "showed disgust when she spoke of Islam in class."

According to Islamic law, the word of inferior Christians cannot stand against that of superior Muslims—even if they are resentful or confused children.

Released on bail, Dimyana is unable to talk and "suffering a nervous breakdown."

The report continues:

Criminalizing blasphemy was enshrined in the country's Islamist-backed constitution that was adopted in December. Writers, activists and even a famous television comedian have been accused of blasphemy since then. But Christians seem to be the favorite target of Islamist prosecutors. Their fragile cases — the main basis of the case against Abdel-Nour's case the testimony of children — are greeted with sympathy from courtroom judges with their own religious bias or who fear the wrath of Islamists, according to activists. The result is a growing number of Egyptians, including many Christians, who have been convicted and sent to prison for blasphemy…. Part of the Salafis' antagonism toward Christians is rooted in the belief that they were a protected group under Mubarak's regime while they, the Salafis, were persecuted. Now empowered, they may be out to exact revenge on the Christians....

Indeed, before President Obama threw Hosni Mubarak under the bus in the name of "freedom" and "democracy," Christians were at least legally protected: Muslim mobs were limited to lawless attacks on Christian churches and persons. But now that the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafis are in charge, Egypt's Christians are now also experiencing legal persecution in the courtrooms, especially in the context of blasphemy.

The following cases of blasphemy laws targeting Christians, some of which were never reported in the West, represent a mere sampling of post "Arab Spring" Egypt. For many more such cases, including all around the Muslim world, see my new book Crucified Again: Exposing Islam's New War on Christians (April, 2013, published by Regnery in cooperation with Gatestone Institute.

Human rights activist Magdi Khalil of Coptic Solidarity told me that in all these cases "Islamist prosecutors rely exclusively on circumstantial evidence. And the judges do not behave like impartial judges, but rather as demagogues haranguing an already frenzied mob, and then sacrificing the Copts to satisfy them. Nor do they allow any representation for the accused. Judges just show up and pass their verdicts in very brief mock trials."

Such is the new Egypt that Obama helped create—despite all the glaring warning signs that it would develop just like this. Christian persecution in Egypt has gone from being a common, though technically illegal, phenomenon, to being widespread, and now legal.

Raymond Ibrahim is author of Crucified Again: Exposing Islam's New War on Christians. A Middle East and Islam expert, he is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center and associate fellow at the Middle East Forum.

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