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The Massacre Was Not at the Rod and Gun Club

Written by Charles G. Mills

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GunFreeZoneSignGLEN COVE, NY - Of course there are no massacres at the Rod and Gun Club. Two-thirds of the worst American massacres of our generation have been at public universities, high schools, and elementary schools. There are both supernatural and natural reasons for this.

The Aztecs and the Carthaginians sacrificed babies. The Romans discarded them. Our contemporaries kill them in the womb. Chesterton said that the killing of babies is a sign of the presence of the devil. Public schools are the most obvious place where American society has completely excluded God. We should not be surprised if this leaves room for the devil.

Furthermore, the people who run our public schools belong to organizations that primarily support candidates for public office who believe that the government should finance the unrestricted killing of unborn babies. It is as if they have put out the welcome mat for the devil on the steps of the public schools.

Public schools are a target for these massacres for a second reason. When I was visiting friends in Newtown, Connecticut, a few years ago, two of us went trap shooting. A madman in Newtown would get nowhere if he tried to shoot people at the local trap range. One simply does not hear of attempted massacres at trap and skeet ranges, rod and gun clubs, rifle and pistol clubs, or National Rifle Association conventions. The reason is obvious.

John Fund, national affairs columnist for National Review Online, writes that no one puts a sign in front of his house saying, "This is a gun-free zone." Yet public schools essentially do precisely this when they let the whole world know that madmen will not meet armed resistance. One is less likely to meet resistance to an armed attack at a public school than at the charitable homes run by the Little Sisters of the Poor.

When two students killed so many at Columbine, the one faculty member with a pistol had been forced by school rules to leave it in a car parked some distance from the school.

Most public schools have what they term a "zero-tolerance policy" on weapons. This often means Draconian punishment for anyone -- faculty, student, parent, or visitor -- who brings a firearm; sword; knife; fingernail file; picture or model of a firearm, tank, or battleship; or scissors on the campus; or who draws such pictures in class. This policy includes one-inch pen knives and key rings with one-inch plastic replicas of weapons. The rules of public schools have created the perfect soft targets.

The advocates of radical limitations on firearm ownership are already flooding the country with false information. During the course of only a few hours, one cable news station described the United States as the most heavily armed country in the world and the fourth most heavily armed country in the world. In both cases, the station ignored Switzerland and Israel.

In Israel less than two generations ago, the percentage of male adult citizens carrying concealed pistols shot up to 15 percent, as did a significant percent of women doing so. Israel is a much safer place today than it was 50 years ago because of this.

In Switzerland, virtually every male citizen is entrusted by the government with a military weapon that he keeps in his home. Switzerland is not known for high rates of violent crime.

We need to rethink the weapons policies in our schools. At least half a dozen teachers in each school should be allowed to carry concealed pistols and to shoot to kill if a madman is killing children. The public should be informed that, if necessary, the high school rifle team will fight back.

Society has a duty to protect the lives of its six- and seven-year-olds; this duty does not mean that we should stand by as they are slaughtered while we wait for the police.

###The Confederate Lawyer archives###

The Confederate Lawyer column is copyright © 2012 by Charles G. Mills and the Fitzgerald Griffin Foundationwww.fgfBooks.com. All rights reserved. ###

 

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