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Christmas Responses Taken To Extremes

Written by Frederick Meekins

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January 24, 2009
by Frederick Meekins

At one point in its history, one could argue that the West was too sure of itself as the foremost of civilizations.  However, such is no longer the case today.

In theory, pluralists and multiculturalists contend that no way of life or culture is better than any other.  Thus, one would think that Western and American perspectives and traditions would be welcomed into this expanded showcase of human achievement.

Yet unless one wants to bash the West for its past short comings, they had better think again.  If anything, one is expected to feel the same kind of shame in regards to the most innocuous of traditions that was once reserved for more carnal subjects during exceedingly Victorian times.

As an endearing symbol of all that is good and beautiful in the world, one would think there would be no reason whatsoever to get all flustered over a Christmas tree.  However, liberals in media and education who any other time believe next to nothing should be hidden even for the sake of propriety and decorum can't even seem interestingly to speak this festive decoration's name nor even that of the celebration in which this symbol has come to play an integral part.

Plastered across the front page of the Gazette papers of the Washington, DC Metropolitan for the week of 12/25/08 in bold oversized typeface was an otherwise bland "Happy Holidays".

Above that and below a photo of an illuminated Christmas evergreen was a caption reading, "Crowds gather around the 60-foot tree for the lighting ceremony and fireworks show to kick off the holiday season on Nov. 28 at National Harbor."  What holiday is this editor referring to --- Arbor Day?

Martin Luther King Day and Black History Month are just around the corner.  Will this same paper tiptoe around these celebrations as well?

If not, why not?  Christmas is probably celebrated by nearly 90% of the American population so we are basically forced to go out of our way to avoid stepping on the toes of a very miniscule demographic.

By default, there is probably a higher percentage than that among the White community who have thought to themselves (even if they lacked the backbone to vocalize their ruminations for fear of repercussions at the hand of the fanatically tolerant) that Black History Month is inherently racist since there is no officially designated counterpart for White folks to be applauded for simply being White folks.  But then again, since those raising such concerns are usually conservative, their sensibilities will not be addressed.

Martin Luther is believed to have said that man is like a drunk reeling his head from one wall to the next.  This can be interpreted as an analogy of how society careens back and forth between deleterious extremes.

In response to the efforts to expunge Christmas from American culture, some have not simply responded by declaring more than "Merry Christmas" irrespective of the consequences but rather by wearing to work what ostensively amounts to a Jesus costume consisting of a robe and a replica of a crown of thorns.  Of this, I am reminded of a quote from King of the Hill where the titular character responds to a longhaired, tattooed preacher, "I'm sure Jesus is plenty of places he doesn't want to be."

While nothing should be done to employees that exercise their right of conscience by saying "Merry Christmas" rather than "Happy Holidays", supervisors should not put up with subordinates showing up to work like this especially if the position deals with the public.  It is, after all, the workplace under consideration and not a costume party.

Chesterton said,  "It's the first effect of not believing in God that you lose your common sense."  From how many respond to Christmas in either censoring it entirely or becoming so consumed by it they end up looking like fools, it seems America may be tottering along the abyss of total lunacy.


 

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