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The Obama Green Team for Energy and the Environment

Written by RSN

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January 19, 2009
Right Side News Reports
The Obama Green Team is shaping up to be quite a group of activist.
steven_chu_changegov_press.pngSteven Chu, Secretary of Energy
Chu has been a vocal advocate for more research into alternative energy and nuclear power, arguing that a shift away from fossil fuels is essential to combat global warming.[10][11][12]

He has joined the Copenhagen Climate Council,[13] an international collaboration between business and science, established to create momentum for the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. More HERE

lisa_jackson_epa_administrator.jpgLisa Jackson, EPA Administrator
DEP employees describe Ms. Jackson as employing a highly politicized approach to decision-making that resulted in suppression of scientific information, issuance of gag orders and threats against professional staff members who dared to voice concerns.[6] The environmental magazine Grist interviewed several New Jersey environmental activists and reported that opinion about Jackson was divided: "The split seems to be between those who work on energy and climate policy in the state's capital [who were supportive of Jackson] and those who work on toxic cleanups at the local level [who were critical of her]."[7] 
MORE HERE
 
While DEP Commissioner, she led a staff of 2,990 professionals responsible for protecting, sustaining and enhancing New Jersey’s water, air and land, and preserving its wealth of natural and historic resources. Many environmentalists are cheered by the prospect of a Jackson-led EPA. The environmental advocacy group Environment New Jersey praised the New Orleans native, calling her selection “180-degree turnaround for the United States on the environment.”  But others have been highly critical of her management style and political polarizing.  Questions arise.

From the GlobeandMail:

CAROL BROWNER Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change. Former EPA administrator under president Bill Clinton supported U.S. signing on to Kyoto Protocol, and was active in environmental groups backing a national cap-and-trade system.

STEVEN CHU Energy Secretary. Former head of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, he directed research on renewable energy. A staunch advocate of national greenhouse gas emissions standards.

LISA JACKSON Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency. New Jersey state environmental administrator, chairwoman of the northeast Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which established a cap-and-trade system among northeastern power utilities.

*****

And then, there is Carol Browner! My, oh my.

The Rule of the Green Czar
By
Kathy Shaidle
FrontPageMagazine.com | Friday, January 16, 2009

Carol Browner, Barack Obama's nominee for energy-environment "czar," didn't preside over the pardons of terrorists in the 1990s; she doesn't owe thousands in back taxes; and she isn't mired in an ongoing investigation. She is, however, a card-carrying socialist who used public office for political pressure and was accused of presiding over a department that treated intelligent African-Americans as "uppity."

Until recently, Browner, whose official title will be "Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change," was a "commissioner" of the Socialist International, the umbrella group for 170 "social democratic, socialist and labor parties" in 55 countries Specifically, she worked with the Commission for a Sustainable World Society.
In the grand Soviet tradition of the "disappearing Commissar," her biographical profile was deleted from the Socialist International's website shortly after her appointment, but not before critics had a chance to scrutinize the group's extreme, anti-capitalist agenda.

"Socialist International is precisely what it sounds like," Steven Milloy explained on FoxNews.com. Milloy noted that the group "favors the nationalization of industry, is skeptical of the benefits of economic growth and wants to establish a more ‘equitable international economic order.'" The last phrase is inevitably a codeword for redistribution of wealth on a global scale. (See William R. Hawkins' related piece, "Obama's Environmental Agenda: Made in China.") Thus, the Socialist International's "organizing document" blames capitalism for "devastating crises and mass unemployment" alongside "imperialist expansion and colonial exploitation." Similarly, Socialist International's Commission for a Sustainable World Society, the organization's action arm on climate change Browner worked on, "says the developed world must reduce consumption and commit to binding and punitive limits on greenhouse gas emissions."

What makes Browner's association with the Socialist International noteworthy is that, after the worldwide failure of socialism, she continues to share many of its anti-capitalist views - and if confirmed as climate czar, she promises to translate them into policy. For example, Browner, calls herself a "strong backer" of "utility decoupling." Under "decoupling" schemes, utility companies will be required to provide less energy, while the government guarantees the companies steady or increased profits through "taxpayer subsidies" and "voluntary" conservation measures. In other words, taxpayers will be given grim Carter-era exhortations to put on sweaters rather than turn up the thermostat and be forced to pick up the tab for utility companies' reduced earnings, while getting less energy in return.

Browner's penchant for such dubious environmentalist schemes is just one troubling aspect of her nomination. Another is her history of abusing her office for political gain and a record on minority rights that can rightly be called troubling.
 
In 1995, Browner used her position at the EPA to lobby environmental groups to oppose the Republican-led Congress, faxing out documents opposing the GOP's regulatory initiatives. In a rare show of political unity, Browner was condemned by Republicans and Democrats, who accused her of violating the Anti-Lobbying Act. A stinging letter to Browner from a bipartisan subcommittee of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee noted, "The concerted EPA actions appear to fit the definition of prohibited grass-roots lobbying...The prima facie case is strong that some EPA officials may have violated the criminal law."

This was not the only time that Browner was accused of abusing her authority. According to a February 2001 report in Time magazine, the EPA was plagued with "festering racial problems" during Browner's time in charge. One African-American EPA employee, Dr. Marsha Coleman-Adebayo, told Time that she'd been passed over for promotions for being "too uppity," adding, "We [African-American employees] were treated like Negroes, to use a polite term. We were put in our place." Coleman-Adebayo was later awarded $600,000 in damages in a settlement that found
the EPA guilty of "discrimination and retaliation against whistleblowers." Shortly thereafter, Congress passed the "No Fear" government whistleblower protection act in response to the Coleman-Adebayo v. Carol Browner decision. Dr. Coleman-Adebayo lamented in a recent interview, "The very woman I prevailed against in court is being elevated to a White House decision-level position."

At least 150 EPA employees filed similar lawsuits during Browner's time there. In one particularly bizarre incident, blogger Shawn Mallow notes, "Anita Nickens, an EPA specialist, and the only black present during a visit of Mrs. Browner, was told to clean the toilet prior to her arrival. Afterward, the rest of her white co-workers bragged about it."

This lawsuit didn't come up during Browner's January 15 interview with Lois Romano of the The Washington Post. Instead, Browner joked with her interrogator about being a "czarina," and bemoaned the fact that the list of Bush initiatives she plans "to roll back" is "unfortunately...rather long."

Ultimately, it is Browner's radical Green politics - of which her affiliation with the Socialist International is but one manifestation - that are the most troubling. Although Browner insists "we don't have to choose between strong public health, environmental protections and a strong economy," economists disagree. As the country reels from an economic recession, her policies may be just radical enough to snatch recession from the jaws of recovery.


Kathy Shaidle blogs at
FiveFeetOfFury.com. Her new book exposing abuses by Canada's Human Rights Commissions, The Tyranny of Nice, includes an introduction by Mark Steyn.
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